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20121121
20121121
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
focus on the real issues facing america, like catching up -- that's a homeland is a tv show on showtime. [laughter] let's move to nonfiction. it is a privilege for me to be at the council on foreign relations, and thank you for hosting, and and for moderating. i see a number of people in the audience who have done such important work in the space, some of my colleagues and other government agencies. i see charlie firestone from the aspen institute, very involved in issues that i will be talking about today. let me start with one provocative sentence from jeffrey sachs of columbia university. he said recently the information and communications technology revolution is surely the most powerful single force for economic development in the world today. so i want to talk about that today, about the enormous opportunities the broadband revolution is creating. i will also talk about the dangerous fact that the global internet is at a crossroads. threats to the future of the internet have never been more serious, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the pric
was going to repeal it on day one and everybody in america knew it. so what is speaker john boehner talking about? here's the thing. we always knew it was going to be a tough fight. i think the american people need to step up and remind the republicans what they said in the campaign. and that means that the election is one thing but active citizenship is another and these guys are going to try to balance this fiscal slump on the backs of the most vulnerable. we are not going to be able to tolerate that. it's time for folks to start writing, calling, and letting their voices be heard one more time to make sure that this thing is done right. >> now, governor rendell, is immediately rejecting boehner's omnicare ploy. i'm quoting what they said. it's a total nonstarter. boehner's office knows that. so even bringing it up is counterproductive. is it counterproductive? and why are they bringing this up, governor? >> well, first of all, let's make one thing clear. the cbo has said definitively that the affordable health care act will not increase the federal deficit. they said it will reduce it sl
employers in america and has stayed away from the union. can we say that because they have stayed away from the union they have been this successful? >>guest: of course. it is in their best interest to keep their labor wages low and to -- they provide things on a very low price and in the best interest of the american people because the reason why walmart is able to provide things with such a low price is because they aren't unionized. i don't thinks will have any sympathy for the workers. we have five million people per year apply to work out walmart and only a small fraction actually get that job. people are going to look at this --. >>eric: please continue to talk about the union effects on things we do like fly, shopping, trying for get home. here is a live shot at los angeles, the protests, people are protesting, this is what the unions are doing, what they are telling their members to do, telling friends of the unions to do, and they are disrupting every day americans' lives. is this what the union membership is supposed to be about? >>guest: why think so. this is how it has evolved.
to break out of the strangle hold, look like it's standing up for america, they will come to the table with the president. >> and one thing that i do think -- i don't know if norquist deserves credit, but i'm struck when i step back and look at where the tax debate is today. both democrats and republicans agree that we should keep 80% of the bush tax rates. bush tax cuts, i'm sorry. it's just the top percent that should change. even democrats today are closer to the bush consensus on taxes than to the clinton consensus on taxes. so do you think this conversation has moved to the right? or were the rates too high for this moment when the middle class is struggling. >> i wouldn't say that a consensus to reduce taxes on the middle class and increase taxes on the rich is a move to the right. it's actually a move to the left. what people are becoming more sensitive to is inequality of income and wealth and opportunity and power in this country is wider than it has been in about 85 to 100 years. therefore, it's appropriate and necessary to raise taxes on the rich and reduce the tax burden on
turkey that i shall be eating tomorrow with two of my wonderful grandchildren, in america, giving thanks that i don't live in france. i left california years ago. i didn't invest in facebook. and oh, mr. trumka, have a nice day. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! male announcer ] lease a 2013 ml350 for $599 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. stuart: just listen to this, china is set to build the world's tallest building in 90 days. its name is sky city. it will be built at the unbelievable rate of five floors per day. question, if unions were involved, it would take 90 days to get the permits, wouldn't it, and just set the scaffolding up, the bureaucracy in america certainly wouldn't help either. don peebles is a real-estate developer. your experience please? >> look, i think that the cause for the delays in building permits is overregulatory environment that we face. obviously we want our buildings to be safe. but the bureaucracy and the regulations of the bureaucracy i
or one department of a store in north america that is union represented today. then in 2005, 2006, they shifted tactics and ran basically a public relations and political campaign against walmart out of washington. that had some pressure effect on walmart. what's happening now is somewhat different in that what's happening is that they're organizing -- they're trying to disrupt walmart organizing walkouts of workers outside the stores. it is much harder to suppress that than unionization votes but the question is whether enough workers will have the courage and are angry enough to actually walk out and it is possible they will but it's hard to envision right now. because they have -- it has been pretty small. >> jennifer: we'll see what happens on friday. obviously it is getting a lot of publicity. you never know whether something like that has an impact long-term. how is it that walmart has been allowed to do this to workers for years? i don't know if even they could be subject to penalties that might force them to ch
. viagra. talk to your doctor. see if america's most prescribed ed treatment is right for you. >>> whether you call it the fiscal cliff, the austerity bomb or just another manufactured political crisis, the fed chair says investors are making moves to plan for gridlock on the road to fiscal redemption. >> coming together to find fiscal solutions will not be easy. but the stakes are high. >> okay. if the stakes are so high, why is congress still playing chicken. >> failure is still an option, but what would that mean? we will discuss next on "now." my insurance rates are probably gonna double. but, dad, you've got... [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? >>> if we're going to raise taxes we're going to do it on everybody. that to me is fairness. i don't think anybody's taxes ought to be raised. i'm offended listening to the people responsible for this blame the american people because they're not paying enough in taxes for the problem. that's no
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)